Short Field Takeoff

The Dangers Of A Short Field Takeoff

A Short Field Takeoff

For pilots one of the most challenging situations are the short field takeoff. But add to that density altitude and you have even more of a challenge!

Over the years I have encountered a number of times when a short field takeoff was required by runway length or density altitude considerations; however, I never trusted the charts to be completely accurate because the aircraft I was flying was not brand new flown by a test pilot. As a result I always added a safety margin. [Read more...]

P51 Mustang Ford Mustang

P51 Mustang AircaftWhat do the P51 Mustang airplane and the Ford Mustang car have to do with each other?

I recently ran across an old article entitled “Two P-51 pilots reunite with their warbirds…” about their being reunited with the aircraft they flew while at Oshkosh in 2009. Brothers had flown Mustang aircraft in World War II. The article was about Cuthbert (Bill) Pattillo and Charles (Buck) Pattillo, twin brothers who wound up flying missions over Europe. [Read more...]

Herch’s Aviation Picks Of The Week

John Travolata

John Travolata

It must be nice to own your very own Boeing 707 to fly around on business!

Just think, no worries about fuel costs, no management to tell you how to operate and no one to be accountable too!

It must be nice! [Read more...]

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The City Of Richmond Ford TriMotor

Ford Tri-Motor The City Of Richmond In Flight on www.all-things-aviation.com

Ford Tri-Motor The City Of Richmond In Flight

In 2009 this Ford TriMotor (also known as a “Tin Goose“) was sold at auction. What a beautiful aircraft this is!

The story of the Ford Trimotor began with William Bushnell Stout, an aeronautical engineer who had previously designed several aircraft using principles similar to those of Professor Hugo Junkers, the noted German aircraft designer.

In the early 1920s a group of 19 investors led by Henry Ford invested in the Stout Metal Airplane Company. [Read more...]

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78 And Still Going Strong – The Douglas DC-3

Air Columbia DC-3 by Juan Carlos Rocha for Infosurhoy.com

Air Columbia DC-3 by Juan Carlos Rocha for Infosurhoy.com

The venerable Douglas DC-3 first flew on December 17, 1935 and many of them continue to fly to this day.

16,079 different variants of the Douglas DC-3 were manufactured and by 1998 over 400 were still flying.
10,048 were military variants of the Douglas DC-3 designated the C-47 and C-53. American Airlines inaugurated passenger service on the Douglas DC-3 on June 26, 1936, with simultaneous flights from Newark, N.J. and Chicago, IL. [Read more...]

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Challenger 600 Aspen Colorado Crash

Canadair Challenger 600 at www.all-things-aviation.com

Canadair Challenger 600

When landing an airplane beware of a tail wind!

Earlier a Canadair Challenger 600 crashed in Aspen, CO while attempting to land with a substantial tail wind.

On January 5th, 2014 3 Mexican pilots flying a Bombardier Challenger 600 attempted to land at the Aspen/Pitken airport in Aspen, CO. [Read more...]

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8 Airliner Accidents By Suicide

Airliner Crash Debris

Airliner Crash Debris

Did you ever wonder when you got on an airliner whether or not the pilots were mentally stable? Probably not.

However, there have been any number of airliner accidents over the years in which suicide was either clear or suspected. In some cases these accidents resulted in death to passengers on board.

It should surprise no one that pilots are also subject to some of the same maladies that the general population is. [Read more...]

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