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LearJet 60 1/35
LearJet 60 1/35
LearJet 60 1/35
LearJet 60 1/35
LearJet 60 1/35

All Things Aviation

LearJet 60 1/35

$259.95
LearJet 60 1/35 Scale: 1/35 scale model Wing Span: 15.25 inches Length: 20 inches The Learjet 60 is a mid-size cabin, medium-range business jet aircraft manufactured by Bombardier Aerospace in Wichita, Kansas. Powered by two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW305A engines, it has a range (with 4 passengers and 2 crew) of 2,405 nautical miles (4,454 km) with NBAA 100 nmi (190 km) reserves, ISA.[3] In July 2012 Bombardier Aerospace announced a temporary "production pause" of the latest variant Learjet 60XR to begin in the fourth quarter of 2012.[4][5] Development A Learjet 60 on climb-out The Learjet 60 is an improved version of the Learjet 55, with a longer fuselage and more powerful turbofan engines. It first flew on 10 October 1990 and received FAA certification in January 1993.[6] The modifications that converted the Learjet Model 55 into a Model 60 resulted from an aerodynamics improvement program and a need to increase the capacity of the Learjet product line. Several of these modifications were a first for Learjet, including an all-new inboard wing cuff added to the inboard sections of the “Longhorn” wing and an all-new wing-to-body fairing. By increasing the wing chord and the leading edge droop, the wing cuff improved handling during approach and landing, while the wing-to-body fairing reduced the interference drag between the wing and the fuselage. Since the engines were new for this aircraft, a new engine pylon had to be designed. The lines of the cockpit have not changed but the fuselage was lengthened. In addition, the blend between the fuselage and the empennage was all new. While it appears as if area ruling was the intention of the blending, the blend design was really driven by attaching the original Learjet Model 35 empennage onto the larger Learjet Model 60 fuselage. The final aerodynamic improvements to the Model 60 included the creation of the distinctive "ogive" winglet trailing edge. This lengthening of the chord near the interface of the winglet and the wing improved the interaction of the wing's pressure spike with the winglet's pressure spike. The result was a significant lowering of the drag in this area and a significant improvement of the wing's efficiency. On the prior “Longhorn” wing the interference between the winglet and the wing nearly canceled the effects of the winglet. The single ventral fin was also replaced with two ventral fins that Learjet called "Delta Fins" to improve stall characteristics and promote aerodynamic stability. The Learjet 60 is notable for its time-to-climb performance, climbing to 41,000 feet (12,497 m) in 18.5 minutes at maximum weight. It also distinguished as the last legacy Learjet, using a variation of the wing that designer Bill Lear adapted from the Swiss military aircraft, the FFA P-16.[citation needed] The next-generation Learjet was to be the Learjet 85 and was an all-new design by Bombardier Aerospace slated for delivery in 2013.[7] The Learjet 60, while a tremendous performer, also maintains the highest incident/accident rate in its class with most accidents occurring during landing. The use of the original Lear 23 gear and wheels (albeit it with an added brake rotor, bringing the total to 3 per wheel assembly) left the 60 (and the 55 before it) notably under-geared and under-braked. According to the NTSB most of these failures are caused by pilot-error as the aircraft can be unforgiving.[8] Production of the Learjet 60 ended in 2007 after 318 aircraft had been built. The Learjet 60XR was a variation with upgraded Proline 21 avionics and slight improvements to the cabin, with production from beginning at serial number 319Bombardier Aerospace. By 2018, a Learjet 60 can be had for $1 million or less.[9]
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LearJet 60 1/35

LearJet 60 1/35

$259.95